Embroidery

Walking out of the Pedestrian gate at the general hospital with two of my classmates in a smug cloud of white coat, oblivious to the throng of family and friends on the other side of the gate waiting for the clock to reach 10 AM, the beginning of visiting hours, anticipation etched haphazardly across their concerned faces, I am very aware of them but I stare at a spot above their heads. I am not sure about how I should put my face, the strange familiarity of harsh antiseptic and the air-conditioned chill of hospital environment still settling on my young shoulders. I am here to learn but these people see my coat and they answer “Yes please” when I speak to them, these people that the Nigerian daughter in me feels compelled to address as “Aunty” and “Uncle”, do they know how often I have to remind myself that I don’t need to slightly bend my knees in greeting as I approach them? All eyes are on us, the Security lady waves us through, she does a great job of acknowledging us with a simple tilt of her head and effusive swinging of the small gate and we swell in gratitude.

“Heyy Doctor Ijeoma! Nwa’m, kedu?”

I freeze. My classmates, Indian and Ghanaian, also stop in solidarity, the questions crossing their eyes are who knows her name? Is that her language? What is happening? The dark skinned lady in the crowd has a familiar voice, her teeth form a sharp contrast against red lips, her smile reminds me of the lady on cabin biscuit, I am impressed by the whiteness of her teeth and taken aback by the happiness starting from her kohl-lined eyes and radiating through her small frame. Is she this excited from seeing me? She sounds like home. Of course I know she is Igbo, I don’t recognize her and I immediately feel a rush of panic, guilt and shame. This feeling is unfamiliar, I try to smile but she sees past my weak smile and focuses on the contours that have formed above my eyebrows, I am confused. We have walked past the gate and are stood at the edge of the small crowd, the moment was picture perfect for some W.H.O sensitization images if you will, “Young Doctors Speak on HIV/AIDS” would’ve worked fine as a caption.

I move closer to My Igbo Aunty and reach out to hold her, maybe holding her will jog my memory. I have never seen this face in my life. Ijeoma say something, all eyes are on you now, you cannot afford to embarrass your Aunty like this in another man’s land, I tell myself. “O di mma Aunty, how do you know my name?” I smile at the awkwardness, wishing for both our sakes that I knew how to ask her the question in Igbo, the ears around us are too much. She is very kind, I can tell from her eyes that she is disappointed but not surprised at my inability to use our language to cement our bond, to wow the crowd. She simply says “I saw it on your body, it is written on your coat.” The relief washing over me deflates my apprehension, alas my parents did not send someone to watch me move around this hospital as if I know what I am doing, lol. We part ways with her “Jisike, o” tapping my shoulder.

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Medical Education – Lecturio Medical School Survival Guide

Feel free to share this piece with your friends and peers, spread the word wherever you want & make Lecturio Med School Survival Guide your lifesaver in 2018!

This post is useful for students currently in medicine, preparing for medicine or finishing medicine in United States or Caribbean Medical Schools.


 

Hello! Merry Christmas and happy new year in advance.

I bring you great news, Lecturio has released a Med School Survival Guide which you can DOWNLOAD  here:

 http://lectur.io/survivalguide

You wonder how the guide was developed? They have gathered their best medical advisors, distilled their experience and put into one piece – just for you!

Feel free to share this piece with your friends and peers, spread the word wherever you want and make Lecturio Med School Survival Guide your lifesaver in 2018 and beyond!

From your fellow med student,

J.

Medical Education – FIRECRACKER

Hello – I’ve got a discount on Firecracker to share.

This post is useful for students in medicine, nursing, and other health sciences, preparing for their board licensing and or certificate examinations.


Hello – I’ve got a discount on Firecracker to share. It provides discounts on 1 year subscription, or 2 years and lots of other terms as well.

This will give you access to all USMLE Step 1, Step 2, and COMLEX content as well as the Q-bank and library of 15 practice exams!

“In a 2007 report by the Institute for Education Sciences (IES) entitled “Organizing Instruction and Study to Improve Student Learning”, the IES isolated a collection of principles from hundreds of studies on student and instructor behavior to inform the education community of actionable techniques that improve learning outcomes. Firecracker embodies these principles through a combinatorial approach of curriculum alignment, daily concept review, and higher-order assessment.”FIRECRACKER EFFICACY REPORT

Firecracker integrates content from Sketchy Micro, Pathoma and Wikipedia to provide Flash Cards that are tailored to meet your para-study needs as well as other fun stuff like group study, daily clinical vignette, timed study, inter-med school competition etc.

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Other cool features:

Firecracker Board Bundles offers a more effective alternative to the traditional UFAP + Sketchy approach to board prep. They’ve combined a U-World inspired Qbank, thousands of First Aid-style topic summaries, and two companion content modules for Pathoma and Sketchy. All in a single package. All for less than 25% of what you’d pay for those others.

Study Something Specific allows you to study something other than what Firecracker recommends for you each day, it provides you with a way to tell Firecracker  what you’ve learned each week, and also, allows you to prioritize everything you’ve learned for review.

The Firecracker App is delightful to look at and easily navigable, it is available for download on the Apple App store for iOS and Google Play Store for Android operating systems.

Don’t forget to disable adblock on your browser before you sign up, the link expires after 24 hours but that’s okay, it is always here when you need it!

Click on this link to sign up today: http://mbsy.co/j9fvC 😉

Diary – IJEOMA W.

Ijeoma shares a story of her family, values, and how she has incorporated higher education as self development in her life’s journey with online learning tools.

4TH MAY 2017, 12:31 AM

Learning is infinite in my family. We go to school, rest small, and then go back to school.

My mommy once said to me “You know in this family we are not traders or “business people”, what we do is book, so please read.” Both my parents have at different points in their lives studied for six degrees (combined), including professional certificate examinations. I have known about online education for a hot while now, at a point when I was in secondary school the dinning table in my house was practically a satellite university campus because my daddy was taking a Master’s degree program from a foreign university via the internet. Last year my Uncle Roman Oseghale graduated from the prestigious Telfer School of Management and Centre for Executive Leadership, University of Ottawa, Canada and last week he was the 8th speaker at The Platform. Essentially, “Book” is central to who I am becoming because my role models figuratively said so.

I took my first online course before I turned 18. The thing about having access and privilege is that if you don’t use it, it would have been a waste. On a rather uneventful day in my dorm room (shouts out to Manuwa Hall, University of Nigeria Enugu Campus), I had the opportunity of stumbling upon this website called COURSERA DOT ORG and I became very interested in learning what I was being taught in the classroom by myself, at least the courses I could find, so I started taking online courses that mirrored what my lecturers were teaching me in the classroom.

Part of it I will attribute to sheer curiosity. Coursera offered courses from Universities I could only dream about at the time, the first one I chose (and completed) was by Duke University, my friend Sanmi Oyenuga was studying Engineering there, I wanted to know what being a student at Duke felt like so I stayed up all night, having physically attended lectures during the day, learning and watching all these free lecture videos on my HP laptop with reliable internet courtesy of the “Lionet @ Manuwa” router that was conveniently mounted very close to the Mango tree whose leaves I could pluck if I put my hand through the pigeonhole in front of my room. The WiFi was strongest at night (back when Lionet was still Lionet, oh the sweet memories).

The internet has been good to me. So far, I have expanded my knowledge base and I am open to learning more about the world around me. I have started this free Bioethics course by Harvard University on edX.org today. It started in April, slated to end in October. I hope I finish it within the stipulated 7 weeks at a personal pace of 2 to 3 hours of study per week. Where I’m from, they measure accomplishments based on how much “Book” you know and how many lives you use your knowledge of “Book” to change for the better. I figured, I have unlimited internet data and I want to be successful in my village so why not take a course? On the 25th of April I watched a movie: “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks”, based on a book of same name credited to the incredible medical investigative journalist, Rebecca Skloot, two days ago my Americanah friend Ayi Daniels reminded me of the uproar that is Roe vs Wade and today I signed up for Professor Cohen and the team at HarvardX to school me on Medical Ethics, a course my lecturers have previously taught me in class, just because life is all about patterns, haha.

Thanks for reading to the end, buy yourself a bottle of Fanta!


Originally Posted On Facebook.

Medical Education – LECTURIO

This post is useful for students in medicine, nursing, and other health sciences, preparing for their board licensing and or certificate examinations.


I want to introduce you to this new resource I have been using. It is called Lecturio and they have been helping me a lot with med school and board exam prep. Their aim is to spread knowledge and make high-quality medical education available to as many students as possible worldwide and I must say that I have looked around and they have the highest quality high-yield video lectures from Ivy League professors along with recall questions, updated articles, study materials, and information germane to Medical Education like this one. 

Download The Lecturio 99-Day USMLE® Step 1 Study Schedule designed to help you make the most of your subscription.


LECTURIO

Sign up on Lecturio.com for FREE and subscribe with a Study Plan that fits your needs, you have the option of choosing between 1 month, 3 months or 12 months of unlimited access to lecture videos from world-class instructors and also unlimited access to the new Lecturio Question Bank (QBank) that boasts of more than 1,000 high-yield and 1,600 recall questions..

LECTURIO is an online and offline audio-visual learning platform, LECTURIO App is available on Android and iOS, this is very important because you get to study on the go and save data you would’ve used if you were streaming all those important videos in your spare time, it essentially converts your iPhone, iPad, or Android Device into your mobile classroom. To know more about how this platform can help you in your medical school journey, visit here.


***Please share with your friends and loved ones in medical school or just copy the link to your browser: http://lectur.io/347a

Thank you. I wish everyone in this medical school journey all the best in their exam prep and future careers!

J.